How FPA adapted the new draft plan based on that feedback

Frequently Asked Questions

We Adjusted

The Second Iteration of the OneFPA Network Draft Plan is vastly different from the original draft plan FPA proposed. Why is that?

The intent to create a more unified association through greater alignment and integration to address external and internal challenges is the same. The two core principles that are the foundation of the OneFPA Network vision—democratizing decision-making in the organization and institutionalizing a greater degree of strategic and operational collaboration—also remain. What has changed significantly, based on the feedback from stakeholders, are the details and timing around these core principles.

Who was responsible for developing the Second Iteration of the OneFPA Network Draft Plan?

The Second Iteration of the OneFPA Network Draft Plan was developed by the OneFPA Transition Task Force with the support of two association management consultants and FPA staff, and reviewed and approved by the Board of Directors. This important Task Force, which is comprised equally of national and chapter leaders, was charged with synthesizing all feedback collected throughout the Listening Tour and proposing a new draft of the plan. The volunteer leaders who serve on this task force were selected because of their varying views on the original plan (support and concerns), and because they had the interest and passion to examine what’s best for FPA and important to our members.

At a high level, what were the major changes that were adopted in the new draft plan and were those changes based on feedback provided during the Listening Tour?

The significant modifications occurred in the area labeled ‘centralized functionality’. The three major changes based on feedback from the Listening Tour are: engaging in robust beta-testing with precise goals and measures; focusing on integrated reporting and best practices in the accounting/finance area; and removing the requirement that chapters shift their legal status of being separately incorporated entities.

Did the OneFPA Transition Task Force and Board of Directors consider dropping the plan in its entirety?

Even before the start of the Listening Tour, the Board had considered and was prepared for any outcome, including not moving forward with any aspect of the OneFPA Network vision. Through the Listening Tour experience, it was clear that members and leaders are often confused and/or disconnected from many aspects of FPA, which helped substantiate the need for greater system-wide collaboration and cooperation.

What steps did FPA take to vet the new plan with stakeholders before it was approved by the Board of Directors?

Before the Second Iteration of the OneFPA Network Draft Plan was sent to the Board of Directors for review, the OneFPA Transition Task Force held five focus groups with chapter leaders and members to vet the plan and proposed changes to ensure they addressed the issues raised in the Listening Tour.

Was the Board of Directors supportive of the new plan?

The Board of Directors entered this process with an open mind about the outcome. They leaned on and empowered the OneFPA Transition Task Force to assess the feedback and propose changes to the draft plan. On March 21, 2019, the Board met and reviewed the revised plan and voted to support the new draft plan presented by the OneFPA Transition Task Force.

FPA has now eliminated the provision calling for chapters to be stripped of their legal structures. Why was that decided?

Of all the provisions in the original draft plan, changing the legal status of chapters drew the most concern. While the intent was to further cultural unity and do away with unnecessary legal structures that provided limited value, many chapter leaders did not perceive a sufficient benefit and were concerned that it would limit the autonomy of chapters. The OneFPA Transition Task Force felt that the goals behind the OneFPA Network vision could still be pursued and tested without the provision.

Could FPA at one point still call for chapters to change their legal structures?

There is no plan or intent to re-introduce the legal structure requirement right now. The Board and the OneFPA Transition Task Force are committed to significant testing before any changes are made to the plan or protocols are instituted system-wide. The OneFPA Advisory Council and the Board of Directors will be able to assess the progress under the Second Iteration of the OneFPA Network Draft Plan, including any issues regarding legal structures. After the beta-test chapters are selected, they will have the option to fold into one FPA legal entity as a part of beta-testing, but it will not be required.

Why was beta-testing included in the new plan?

The Second Iteration of the OneFPA Network Draft Plan represents a significant organizational departure from the way FPA currently operates. In support of being a learning organization and understanding that despite the best of intentions, the smart strategy is to take a ‘lean business’ approach, which means to test, verify and adjust before system-wide implementation is considered.

What is the timing and length of the beta-test and what does it mean for other chapters?

Beta-test chapters will commit to a two-year experience beginning on January 1, 2020. Assessing and reporting of the beta-test experience will occur immediately with information provided to all chapters on an ongoing basis. Until the assessments occur, it is impossible to say if, what and when aspects of the OneFPA Network might be instituted system-wide. If it is determined by the OneFPA Advisory Council and the Board of Directors that an aspect of the plan should be instituted system-wide, that could occur with ample notice to all stakeholders and in phases to ensure effective implementation.

What is the desired outcome of the Second Iteration of the OneFPA Network Draft Plan?

Overall, the objective is to create a stronger and more relevant FPA through greater strategic, cultural and operational alignment and integration. Whether we can achieve that objective through the specifics of the Second Iteration of the OneFPA Network Draft Plan will depend on the assessment of a set of goals and measures developed by the OneFPA Transition Task Force in consultation with an independent association management firm.

What is the process for chapters to apply to be a beta chapter?

The OneFPA Transition Task Force will develop the Master Services Agreement and the beta-test application, which will include details about the roles, responsibilities and expectations of beta-test chapters. The beta-test chapter application will be distributed to all chapters on July 11. Interested chapters will submit a completed application by September 9 and beta-test chapters will be selected by September 18. Additionally, the OneFPA Transition Task Force will develop the draft Master Services Agreement and Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) related to beta-test chapters during the 45-day comment period and will share them with FPA stakeholders for feedback from June 3 to July 1—prior to their dissemination on July 11 as part of the beta-testing application process.

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© 2018 OneFPA Network.

  • Connect
  • LinkedIn - White Circle
  • Facebook - White Circle
  • Twitter - White Circle
  • Blog
  • YouTube - White Circle
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© 2019 OneFPA Network.